Why Good Logo Placement Is Strategic for Stronger Branding

hwd (1)

Share with others

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest

View more topics

A strong logo helps communicate what a business is about without the need for words. The more familiar consumers are with your emblem, the more likely they’ll pay attention when they see it on your website, in person or on social media.

In a look at Fortune 500 logos, researchers found around 60% are a combination of words and symbols. Companies such as Ford, Walmart, Pringles and Walt Disney all use a mix of letters and symbols.

No matter what style of logo you choose, though, the placement is equally important. You must know why you put it in specific locations and how users interact with it. The more familiar customers become with your brand style, the more they’ll rely on consistency in the way you use your logo.

Here are some things to keep in mind when placing your logo:

1. Match Customer Expectations

Spend time looking at the other websites by companies in your industry. Where do they place their logo? If 99% of them use the upper left corner and link the logo back to the main page, don’t try to do something too far outside the box.

Customers will expect to see the logo in the upper left corner when they land on your page. If you put it somewhere unfamiliar, they may bounce away. Creativity is OK for some aspects of your design, but always consider usability and expectations when designing your pages.

2. Customize New Signage

The battle against coronavirus means companies have had to add signage displaying their policies. It’s challenging to keep your store open and share the safety information necessary to keep everyone safe. Signage is one of the top ways to notify customers of routines, share tips on CDC guidelines and reassure them you’re following protocols.

When you post new signs indicating where to stand, whether a mask is required and tips such as using hand sanitizer, it’s a great opportunity to include your logo. The top of the sign is the first thing most people look at, so that might be the best place for your emblem.

3. Watch Out for Mishaps

You’ve probably seen the funny memes of placement gone bad. A logo on a van’s sliding door might look different when the door is opened, for example. One airline had their emblem going down an escalator. Unfortunately, it appeared the plane was crashing.

Think through the different positions and how they might change when doing any type of mural, advertising or vinyl wraps for vehicles. Even billboards have an unspoken rule about how to utilize humans in the image.

A good rule of thumb is to always have multiple eyes on a project. You might not see the alignment issues, but another person will catch them, and you can fix the problem before it arises.

4. Look at the Bigger Picture

Think about the meaning behind your advertising. One example is when Folgers placed steaming cups of coffee images over city manhole covers. The problem? While the cup of coffee steamed, it was from human waste and not something anyone in their right mind would consume.

Don’t try to be so trendy and cool that you forget your ads’ underlying impression and subtleties.

5. Go Low on Product Packaging

Lesser-known brands might be tempted to put their logo high on their products. After all, brands such as Apple do so. However, studies conducted by the American Marketing Association show that consumers prefer smaller companies to place their logos lower.

Perhaps they feel you are trying to compete with more established brands. The psychology behind the preference is unproven, but it’s good to know which packaging types people are most drawn to so you can place your logo accordingly.

6. Pay Attention to Contrast

Don’t always place your logo in the same spot on different mediums. Think about what surrounds it. Is there enough white space to set it off? Make sure the colors pop against the background.

If you place the logo over the top of a photograph, is there a lighter or darker section to make it stand out? You may have to nudge it down or over to get just the right placement.

If the logo still doesn’t pop for you, consider adding an overlay color or placing a colored box behind it to set it apart.

7. Choose the Right Size

Selecting just the right size for your logo requires professional know-how. Talk to a designer about how to grab attention without being in the customers’ faces. If you place your logo on a T-shirt, you want it noticeable but not overwhelming.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, if you place your logo on a billboard, can drivers see it from a distance? What about on your storefront sign? Can people driving past glance at it and get a feel for your brand?

Logo Placement Equals Brand Recognition

Your logo should be easily recognizable and stand out from the rest of your design. You want to use it on everything you put out in the world, so consumers get to know you and are drawn to your company.

While you should be aware of good design standards and have some style rules for your own brand, don’t be afraid to think outside the box. It’s OK to try something new, test it and see how your users respond. With a little creativity and a lot of consistency, you’ll build a reliable brand image people will flock to.

Eleanor Hecks is editor-in-chief at Designerly Magazine. She was the creative director at a digital marketing agency before becoming a full-time freelance designer. Eleanor lives in Philly with her husband and pup, Bear.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on google
Google+
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on pinterest
Pinterest